Some Prayer Book and Authorized Version pronunciations


via Anglican Catholic Liturgy and Theology:

Concupiscence (three uses in Paul) – pronounced ‘con-cue-pa-sense’, with a slight stress on ‘cue’.  The second syllable is definitely not to be pronounced as ‘cup’

Gibbet – as in ‘the gibbet of the cross’.  The initial letter is pronounced as a soft ‘g’, as in ‘jet’, not a hard ‘g’, as in ‘get’

Jesu – our Lord’s name in many English hymns, including some sequences in the Anglican Missal.  This is not pronounced as a Latin word but as an English name.  That is, not ‘YeaSue’ but ‘GeeSue’ or ‘JaySue’

Oblation(s) – the initial vowel is a short ‘a’ or ‘o’ (‘ah’) rather than a long ‘o’ (‘oh’) sound

Platted / plaited – in the Passions according to Matthew, Mark, and John, the crown of thorns is ‘platted’ or ‘plaited’.  English printings of the Authorized Version and the Book of Common Prayer tend to read ‘platted’.  The American Bible Society and other American editions of the Authorized Version read ‘plaited’.  The pronunciation depends on the spelling:  in the case of ‘platted’ the vowel would be the same as in ‘platter’; in the case of ‘plaited’ the vowel is as in ‘plain’.

Prophecy – is a noun, and its final syllable sounds the same as ‘see’ or ‘sea’

Prophesy – is a verb, and its final syllable sounds the same as ‘sigh’

Saith – a one syllable word that sounds the same as Noah’s son, Seth.  It is third person singular (he, she, it saith), present tense

Sayest – is two syllables, second person singular present tense (‘thou sayest’)

Shew – is a variant spelling of ‘show’ and is pronounced the same as ‘show’ and not as ‘shoe’

st or –est – in regular verbs, the –st ending signals a second person singular verb, and is therefore only used in direct address to a single person (‘O God, thou lovest all thou hast created’)

th or –eth – in regular verbs, the –th ending signals a third person singular verb, and is therefore only used when referring to (as opposed to addressing) a single person or thing (‘God loveth all that he hath created’)

Throughly – is a variant spelling of ‘thoroughly’ and is found in the Coverdale Psalter in Psalm 51:2.  When so spelled, the word has two syllables and is pronounced ‘threw-lee’

Travail – though it is by now probably pedantic to say so, the tendencies to emphasize the second syllable and to pronounce that syllable as if it were the Colorado mountain city and rhymes with ‘ale’, are incorrect.  The word is pronounced almost the same as ‘travel’, though the vowel in the second syllable is sounded, not contracted away

Victuals – in both the King James Version and the Coverdale Psalter.  The ‘c’ is silent and the word has two syllables, pronounced ‘vit-ls’, not ‘vick-tu-als’

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